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Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)
with a non-custodial parent and they may have left the city. if you know where she is, call police in d.c. >> in takoma park, police continued to search for boy.ssing the 12-year-old was last seen monday night. released.etails him, you are asked to contact police. d.c. mayor vincent gray delivering his state of the district address tonight. status ofport on the the city and his administration and he will outline his agenda year.e you can watch the speech on news at 7:00 p.m. later this morning, you can watch the the ravens fans streets, getting ready for the parade. >> it's time to celebrate the win here at bowl home. be gathered around that includes john gonzalez, was at the superbowl. now he's back in baltimore >> . good morning. the city of baltimore is not time.g any the ravens won the super bowl on sunday. today is celebration time. who is ready for a parade? city hall in downtown baltimore in party mode, as you can see. is little or purple lights, like many of the buildings baltimore. today a banner will be congratulate in the team on its big super bowl against the san francisco 4
pope seated before the holy week. we start with claudio in vatican city. when's the latest? >> reporter: hi, toure. now the countdown is finally started, of course. well, there's no -- usually people don't have the chance to see the -- to know when the end of an end happens because in the past the pope had to die before a new pope could be voted in. this time, we have a date. 28th of february and we got a lot of reaction to the announcement of pope benedict xvi that he is resigning. first of all, look at how he -- well, he abdicated rather than resigning. let's see how. he did that during a low-key affair this morning the vatican meeting with cardinals. wasn't a big deal and he said -- his speech made it in latin. not italian or english or a comprehensible language to most people and it was down to somebody from a local press office, local wire agency to actually figure out that he actually said, well look, i'm going to abdicate. even the way that he resigned or -- sorry. abdicated was kind of low key and he did it as he's done the -- as he's leaved his pontificate all along. low key, s
nudity. the board approved the law by a 7-4 vote in de.s a judge upheld it this week saying nude city not protected as free speech. >> if you use anthem blue cross you just got hit with a rake hike. >> 750,000 anthem customers will see premiums rise according to consumer watch dog. the group says it's the second nim less than a year anthem raised rates in this state. anthem parent company, well point announce aid 38% increase in the 4th quarter of 2012 compared to previous year. and you you saw it for a live report. nice weather in new orleans. >> yes. spencer christian is here with a look at what is ahead coming up this weekend. >> clouds in the sky today, more than yesterday. you can see we have cloudsyñq" down in the southern part of the viewing area. they have not kept us from having another mild day. right now, temperatures into mid to upper 60s across the bay area. 668 in los gatos, during evening hours, we'll continue to see some clouds in the sky. we'll call it partly cloudy skies. breezy in spots. tomorrow morning we'll have hazy filtered sunshine. low temperatures dropping
-year-old in an underground bunker in midland city, alabama. george howell is there. police came out with new details what items the suspect jimmy lee dikes is giving the child. what are they? >> we just heard from the sheriff here, wally olson. he said a few interesting things. we learned that mr. dykes has electric heater and blankets. certainly it's cold in the bunker, about a constant 50 degrees in that bunker underground. they're still able to get the young boy medications he needs. he suffers from asperger's syndrome and dhd. also able to get him the crayons and coloring book. also toys. and there was another interesting thing that i noticed in this particular press conference. when the sheriff said that he wanted to thank mr. dykes, listen to this. >> he's told us that he has a lk heater and blankets inside that he's taking care of him. he's also allowed us to provide coloring books, medication, toys, and i want to thank him for taking care of our child. that's very important. >> reporter: again, he wanted to thank him for taking care of their boy. you can tell this is a very
at the unemployed host: this was advanced by an act from the new york city council. what did it say? guest: the new york city council passed legislation to make it illegal to refuse to consider somebody for a job solely because they are unemployed. it does not mandate that employers must hire unemployed people. it does not even mandate that employers must interview unemployed people what it does say is that the status of being unemployed in and of itself is not a disqualifying job characteristic. it is not something that an employer could use to say she is not working so put her aside. it requires employers to consider all qualified applicants on a fair basis. host: if a person felt they were discriminated against, how could they prove it? guest: there is lots of concern about trial lawyers and lawsuits. people are going to need evidence. they will need to that job ad has line was that either explicitly or implicitly makes it clear that the unemployed are not welcome. they would need statements either from hiring professionals, people somewhere in the process, a lot of workers have called us over t
better the temperature in new york city, 37 degrees and it's actually going to be mild across the northeast all the way down to florida. florida is going to be seeing highs into the 80s across southern parts of the state. 76 in the city of tampa, new york city, 46 degrees for high temperature. take a look at portions of the upper midwest. it will be cold day. minneapolis, high temperature is only going to be 3 degrees. that is warm as it is going to get. you factor in the wind and windchill at the moment north central are frigid. it feels like 35 below zero in fargo. we do have a storm system that is impacting portions of great lakes down to the southeast with areas of heavier rain but overall this system is going to be quick mover. doesn't have a lot of moisture. snowfall amounts in the studio that are going to be relatively lighted where you see the white during the morning hours, otherwise portions of maine could see up to ten inches of snow. that is where we have the winter storm winning. out in west, stormy weather expected. we have a new storm that is going to be impacti
. the first thing i ever did politically was in 1993, lead a tax revolt, pensacola city hall tried to raise taxes by 65%. and they tried -- if we don't raise taxes 65%, this was right after the clinton tax increases and the state. and i was saying this is going to be devastating for our economic development. well, the city -- every city councilman got up there and councilwoman saying we don't get 65% tax increase, the firefighters aren't going to be able to come and rescue your little doggy from the tree. when your children are going to walk down streets that aren't going to be -- and they went on and on, tumbleweeds are going to be rolling -- guess what? we killed the tax increase. you know what happened? they gave their 11 city managers a 35% pay raise the next week. how many times -- why do i bring that up? it ain't just pensacola. every time americans hear politicians on any level saying, you know, we've got to spend more money, or else the world comes to an end. they just don't believe it anymore. >> i have a list of the national horrors that are going to occur when sequestration takes
atlanta and you will get rain in your morning rush hour and mobile and pensacola and panama city. the only snowy weather is to the north behind the storm, breaking out from green bay, oshkosh to chicago. and behind that, it is extremely cold this morning from minneapolis through north dakota. that's a minus 45 windchill in north dakota this morning. that is not fun by any's standards. the next significant storm will arrive on the west coast, as we arrive throughout the day today and move to the middle of the country, especially wednesday night and thursday, potential m major winter storm in kansas and illinois and missouri and iowa. we leave you with a nice sunrise shot there, beautiful red hues. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. mine was earned in djibouti, africa, 2004. the battle of bataan, 1942. [ all ] fort benning, georgia, in 1999. [ male announcer ] usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation because it offers a superior level of protection and because usaa's commitment to serve the military, veterans, and their families is without equal.
of defense when you look and say in a benghazi or, you know, i don't want to go city by city for obvious security reasons. when you look at them, how often do you determine we'll take a look this week and see where with e are security wise. i know, state is a big part. >> the best thing we did is state asked us to join a team that would look at security at 19 embassies and determine what was needed there in order to better secure those facilities. and i think based on that, it gives us the opportunity to then demy additional -- additional marine if we have to take additional steps to make sure that those embassies are not vulnerable. so we do work with the state department when asked to try to help provide some guidance with regards to security. >> how often is a review done in some of these places, for instance, a benghazi. do they -- is it on a -- when the ambassador says, things are getting tougher, or every couple of weeks is it looked as it is deor ituated or gotten better. what kind of matrix is used? >> well, you know, look. the primary -- the primary matrix for that has to rest w
i'm driving back, and it's light at almost 6:00. it's light. look how beautiful new york city is. don't come to me, t.j. t.j. is obviously back, right? >> he must think you're beautiful too. >> i'm wearing a different sweater today. >> but the collar of the sweater looks like a mouse ate it. >> look how beautiful new york city is. where are we? we're in midtown looking north. >> yep, that's northwest. george washington bridge upper left. upper west side on the left part of the screen. that's the reservoir. >> the jacqueline kennedy r reservoir. >> yes, it is. i think they went with onassis. >> sill me me. do you know for the kid at home watching this on the history channel, she was, what, like 31, 32 when she became first lady? >> that's amazing. >> i think it was 31. >> i was 31 when i started "morning joe." >> no. >> you guys know that? >> no, actually. no, you weren't. in fact, you have a birthday coming up. >> no, i don't. i have no birthday coming up. >> yes, he does. all right. time to take a look at the morning papers. "the los angeles times," music fans are in mourning to
of thoughtfulness that needs to happen, rather than arbitrary cuts. host: a lot more stories about your largest city, detroit, and its economic issues. what is the future of that city? guest: detroit has many great things going on, young people moving in, some great projects going on. the challenge in detroit is city government. it is not a recent issue. there are good people in the recent administration. this goes back for decades. the city government is unsustainable in terms of its finances. it needs to provide better services. we have had a review team looking at the finances. one of the question it asks is, do we need to take additional steps to get detroit's finances together? -- working better? oddly partner with the city to get that happening? detroit will be a great city again. that is critically important for the future of michigan. caller: what is happening in detroit is disgraceful. look. you run for office. you get in, you get that power, and all good ideas run out of your mind. it seems like all of the government, including state, is bought and sold to the highest bidder. you start off
advantage of it, without unduly exposing it to our adversaries. let me move on to private city and civil liberties. anytime you're talking about sharing the information, sharing information with respect to cybersecurity, you have to be conscious of privacy and civil liberties and you have to make sure those are protected. that has been a priority of the administration and it continues to be so. so, while there are perhaps fewer concerns in the executive order because the focus is on sharing information outward, we have established a robust, oversight regime and in particular we have highlighted the fips. that is the government speak, right? if i don't insert an acronym every two or three minutes it is just not fun. the fips are the fair information practice principles. these date back to the 1970's when they were developed dealing with health records. essentially it is what are the principles you need to use in considering privacy with respect to information? so we think it's important we establish these as a one of the principles that we're going to follow with respect to sharing inform
, live pictures here, it's a picture from boston, the city hit with more than 21 inches of snow. streets not passable. we will bring you up to date on the storm. boston's mass transit system will be closed until monday at the early yeft, boston on logan airport is set to reopen at 11:00 tonight. bradley airport is remaining closed, the situation will be reevaluated at 6:00, two hours from now. roo rhode island's ban will be lifted. and connecticut as well are removing the ban. i believe we have a live look at hart ford, connecticut, you see there's folks starting to get back out on the streets. that car we just saw in front of the snow plow is about 9 minutes ahead of the travel ban being lifted. you see folks there starting to make their way around as the dig-out begins. some 600,000, more than 600,000 homes and businesses across northeast are in the dark right now. >>> back to politics. president obama not the only person giving a in anticipated speech. florida senator, marco -- rubio will be delivering the gop's response to the state of the union. it's the first time it's going to be
. >> dana: cute. i remember that. okay. i'll go last. i got to go to oklahoma city. lovely people. they love "the five." they told me "relove the five, even bob" is what they would say. i got to go to the memorial. >> bob: i love oklahoma. at the cowboy museum it was great. i saw "oklahomaen "paper and they have a prayer every day and today was ending jealousy and using love instead. that was great. thank you, everybody. that was fun. see you tomorrow. >> bob: happy valentine's day. >> bret: this was supposed to be leon panetta's last day as the pentagon chief, but after a rocky confirmation hearing, senators' demands for other answers the replacement has been temporarily blocked. this is "special report." ♪ ♪ >> bret: good evening. i'm bret baier. bags are packed. ready to head out of town but leon panetta isn't riding nauf the sunset of california retirement yet. senate republicans are blocking a vote on panetta's embattled replacement over among other things questions about the libya terror attack last september. mike emanuel on what is holding up chuck hagel. >> they successfully del
director for the city of chicago and has a special place in her life for it. so thank you, inc. you very much. i would also like to recognize jimmy camp who is here, who's head of the foundation was named for his father, who is the secretary of hud, who i have set in the past with a kind of good working definition of bipartisanship's. it was jack can buy himself. i'm not. [laughter] >> and jimmy was -- he attended the hearing that we had across the country, which were really important in gathering information from across the nation. we thank you in the foundation for your involvement. when the commission began its work, one of the first actions was to examine key demographic trends occurring across the country. an effective housing policy only responds to today's needs, but also anticipates those of the future. our nation is undergoing a profound transformation of society. we are becoming more likely to delay marriage and childbearing and more racially and met with many diverse. members of the echo boom generation, 62 million americans born between 1981 and 1995, they are now beginning t
city. we have got to be more comfortable in talking to people about what works. what is working that other countries are doing. the diversity of the representation in the house will be helpful for that. i think also we have to learn something from how historically brave actions by your predecessors in this caucus played out in the electorate. when were they rewarded? when were they punished? and later rewarded? i cannot tell you how many nights in the white house, every single night before i went to bed, for months and months and months after the 1994 election, i thought about the people who were defeated because they voted for the economic program, because they voted for the assault weapons ban. i knew exactly what happened. i thought a lot about those who survived and why they did. as you look ahead and you decide, what are we going to do about the budget, what are we going to do about having the democrats branded as the party of jobs and innovation for the future? make no mistake about it, the republicans will try very hard not to make it as easy for you to win by-reference.
always been afraid to go into bars that i'm not familiar with. and if you have these cities where people are carrying guns how am i supposed to go into a bar and be relaxed when i don't know if something is going to pull a gun when i say something that brings them mad -- >> be sure to bring a priest and a rabbi with you. >> james tweeted clarification. hagel actually spoke to friends of hummus. >> stephanie: oh, it still sounds scary and middle eastern. michael in wisconsin. hi, michael. >> good morning. >> stephanie: good morning. >> caller: i wanted to elaborate on the conceal/carry legislation in illinois. hb997, unlike some of the tee baggers, i know how to google. i'm kind of concerned about some of the language in the bill it doesn't seem like there are a lot of -- >> stephanie: maybe yb don't you brush up on that and call me back. give that a once over and then give me a ring. not that we wouldn't like to wait. [♪ "jeopardy" theme music ♪] >> didn't we just get done saying that silence is deadly on radio. >> stephanie: what do you people not understand.
morgan city and from tibideaux. they said why are you here? i said the same reason you are. louisiana workers go everywhere. we're proud to do it, but we would be glad to be close to home, canada and mexico. our refineries which for the first time in our nation's history -- not in history, but for the first time in many years, our manufacturing base is expanding. and finally, i would just say in this colloquy, ask the senator from north dakota, did -- has he had a conversation happen with the oil minister from canada -- i think it's minister olivier, has he talked with him at all recently? because i did have a conversation with him yesterday and i wanted to maybe share that with the senator from north dakota. mr. hoeven: i recently visited with the after, gary dewar, please go ahead and relate your conversation. ms. landrieu: i wanted to say i had a very good conversation with the canadian minister of natural resources. we had a long conversation, ten or 15 minutes and explained the importance of this development for canada. he also said to me what i just shared with you all, that he
city you would like more people to be registered to vote but yet they are not and that is a choice people make just like citizenship, correct? >> that is correct. >> thank you. i yield back the remainder of my time. >> the gentleman from north carolina is recognized for five minutes. >> i need recognize your resistance to finding a middle ground short of full citizenship, but i ask you if you were an illegal immigrant and the united states was in the business of enforcing our immigration law and your choice was convicted criminal or almost citizen, you would choose almost citizen, wouldn't you? >> as i said before, do i believe that something is better than the zero? sure. i don't believe it is sufficient, but i don't believe that that addresses the entirety of the problem here. redirecting your attention back to mr. forbes question, which you thought was hypothetical and that if you were given the opportunity to write the law and ensure that it passed and we found ourselves ten years later with a large population of illegal immigrants in the country, would you enforce law or come
. some of the world's cleanest gas turbines are now powering some of america's biggest cities. siemens. answers. >> bret: president obama laid out ambitious agenda on energy efficiency and climb change and education in the "state of the union" tuesday. how much of that has any realistic chance of being adopted? chief white house correspondent ed henry takes a look. >> day two of president obama hitting the road to sell an agenda he thinks has a good shot of passing congress and turning around the economy. >> on tuesday i delivered my "state of the union" address and i laid out a plan for reignating what i believe is the true engine of america economic growth. a thriving, growing rising middle class. >> reality check from speaker john boehner who is declaring it's largely dead on arrival. >> notably it lacked any new ideas. he hoped to millions of americans asking question: where are the jobs? >> he taking aim to boost the minimum wage from $7.25 to $9. which the white house is framing as boon to middle class. >> an idea that governor romney and i agreed on last year. tie minimum wage t
sands mines will be able to expand. right now the size of the city of chicago and plan to expand them to the size of the state of florida. that cannot happen if they don't have access to the global market which is what they want to put this pipeline? they want it as an export pipeline. >> they say 20,000 new jobs could be created. decreased dependency on opec. written in "the new york times" by joe nocera. so how do you convince skeptics? >> well, first of all, we're already processing some of that tar sands oil in the midwest and oklahoma. the reason they want to get this product to the coast is because they cannot get it to the coast in canada. they want to make it available for sale on the global market. this is not oil that is promised to us. it is going to be refined into diesel which is what they do, for the most part, down in the gulf and then make it available for export. we will be bearing all of the risks for this pipeline to go through our aqua firs and through the bread basket of our economy which is experiencing stream drought and when we have fossil furs in that area the
of the largest cities and in some smaller independent operators in smaller cities. a good part of the traffic has been people who stream it online, and that is a pretty dedicated following. in fact, with the very large online content, a good percentage of that comes from the united states. there is an appetite, clearly. how much of that will translate to a cable channel again where some of these folks are dedicated online streamers' is a challenge, but we hope we can provide interesting and freshen up content and have some people cross over. host: how will the recent purchase expand the american audience? who will you be able to reach now? >> -- guest: it is an estimated 50 million viewers. obviously it is a great leap forward and a great deal. one of the things we fought for years was distribution in the americas. this just opens some eyeballs to us, and we hope it will give people a chance to see our coverage, to sample it for those who have not seen it, and again, provide a platform for the core audience we already have. host: it is a 24-hour global news network carried in places like new york
-american relations. he will reconnect with the city in which he lived as a child. we expect international support from mali. italy, in additional to meeting senior officials, he will have a number of multilateral meetings and meet with european allies. we expect italian authorities will invite some of the key countries for the opposition coalition. the secretary will have a chance to meet with the leadership of the counsel separately. he will meet with turkish officials to discuss viral -- bilateral and multilateral issues that we work on together, including ending the crisis in syria and our ongoing cooperation in the area of counterterrorism. in cairo, he will meet with senior egyptian officials and other key political stakeholders, civil society leaders and with the visiti buss community. to encourage political consistence -- consensus and move forward on economic reform. he will take the opportunity to meet with the arabic secretary on our shared challenges. he will meet with the senior saudi leadership to a trust our cooperation on a broad range of issues. he will have a chance to have a mee
to school. that did not happen in new york city. that is a different culture. that is what bill clinton was warning barack obama about. be careful because these people really care about their culture and their life and what they do. they care about different things than you do. part of it is cultural. when you ask somebody, or one of your leaders, you ask about the nra, we are viewed as an advocacy organization that stands up for gun owners and the second amendment. that is about 12%. the rest goes to competition, a gun safety, technical information, and a lot of our research goes into boy scouts, girl scout, bringing people into the shooting sport and teaching them to handle guns safely. there are fewer gun accidents today than there were at the beginning of the 20th century but there are a lot more guns. the only people out there teaching gun safety and training people is the national rifle association. i have got to go. [laughter] i have to go but i will take you to a gun show. [captioning performed by the national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite co
permission to the other side of the city. [laughter] second, i started to pay special attention to the plaques on the buildings that recommend -- that recognize the united states of america for lending a hand in rebuilding. i was proud. the marshall plan, imf, and other organizations led by the united states are evidence of our ability to make the right decisions at the right time, taking risks today in the interest of tomorrow. we now face a similar crossroads. we can be complacent or competitive as markets bloom in every corner of the world. with or without us. we could be there to help plant the seeds or we can see the power to others. given the chance to lead a second great american century, we must not just look to the american landscape today. look at the days to come. we must marshal the courage that define the the marshall plan so that we might secure in the future freedom. let's remember the principles of jefferson's time. looking to independence echoing in our time. america's national interest is in leading strongly and it still in doers in this world. let me leave you
economic growth, while contributing to america's energy independence. for instance, the los angeles city council approved a 25 year $1.5 billion project to buy a solar power produced at the indian nation in the southern nevada desert. when it goes online in 2016, it will be the largest solar power plant on tribal land. capturing race to power over 118,000 los angeles homes. in addition to the plan itself, over 900,000 solar panels will be built on a reservation, creating more jobs in industries that tomorrow. one way to ensure projects like this is to promote fair, equitable tax policy. like all government, tribes must collect and manage their own taxes. right now, tribal governments don't have the same taxing authority by states. a flock of governments, we will continue working with federal partners to fix these policies have the economies grow and become a source of strength and her family of nations. sovereignty is how we secure communities and how they can secure nations and how we will secure future. this is our greatest challenge. a quarter of people in poverty, traced the national
, but i was wondering how risky it might be to have a city -- a sitting president working for or raising money for a 501c4. >> i have not attempted to separate my comments -- i do represent organizing for action, which is the name of the organization you are referring to. i would simply say as you know, i will not be involved in electoral activity at all. to bet sense, it's not confused with activity in an election cycle, the types of concerns the campaign finance sector we're talking about here today. as you know, it is devoted to federal and state public policy and issue development advocacy. it will be operating therefore as a social welfare organization. without going into tremendous amount of discussion about people's views of the feasibility of such an enterprise, i would say this -- the business of communicating on issues in this country and involving one's self in the day- to-day business of grass-roots requires resources. the largest issue we all face is in a country of this size and complexity and even with developments like internet communications which have reduced the cost o
these proclamations, i am turning the south over to the republican party." the city just agreed with the emancipation proclamation. this is in 2013. lyndon johnson fought for all americans. i was debating whether it should be johnson or jimmy carter. jimmy carter, in the final history of this country is written, jimmy carter will be among the best up there, not ronald reagan. look what jimmy carter did, by holding to signing treaties with panama, he gave the panama canal back to the panamanians. george bush's father arrested noriega and put him in jail. thank you. host: the washington post editorial page weighs in on the question -- who gets the washington post this morning on past presidents. iowa, democratic caller, lisa. caller: good morning. president roosevelt. he was the first president i can rememberhcane helped elderly people who did not have anything. i think he started social security. he had a disability, but it did not stop him from being the best president we ever had and never will. host: what would your parents etc. this question? >> they would've said the same thing if they were alive
, so national security issue, so and washington and mexico city the president corporation and building trust, institutional trust mexico understands the views to disagree on something we agree it is such of complicated situation but fighting drugs and trafficking, smugglers, a long way to go but we are much better when fingerpointing would have been with those differences are channels and many times to move on the agenda. but one clarification i am here is a private citizen not public official. when i talk about we it is because it is not we is them. i am hoping you take that into account. what is obvious is the geography with mexico and the destiny of loss. including rocks from columbia, arms not just central america but all over the world salute that is a huge issue. so with needs of social development the flows of people crossing territories as out papers to get to the u.s.. at the same time the source of millions of americans went out of 10 are there and now we received that now is that the core of our own perception of what are mexicans. this graph i did not have time to update bu
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)